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For the study of birds there are at least two reasons why Drew Forest furnishes a highly favorable situation. First, it is one of the great highways of migration between the North and the South. Second, the trees and shrubs provide a wide variety of nesting and feeding places.

Circa 1938

  1. American Robin
  2. Bluebird
  3. Hermit Thrush
  4. Veery
  5. Wood Thrush
  6. Brown Thrasher
  7. Catbird
  8. House Wren
  9. American Redstart
  10. Maryland Yellow-Throat
  11. Oven Bird
  12. Cape May Warbler
  13. Black Throated Green Warbler
  14. Chestnut Sided Warbler
  15. Myrtle Warbler
  16. Black and White Warbler
  17. Magnolia Warbler
  18. Blackburbian Warbler
  19. Black Poll Warbler
  20. Cedar Waxwing
  21. Barn Swallow
  22. Scarlet Tanager
  23. Rose Breasted Grosbeak
  24. Song Sparrow
  25. English Sparrow
  26. Chipping Sparrow
  27. Field Sparrow
  28. Tree Sparrow
  29. White Throated Sparrow
  30. Pine Siskin
  31. American Goldfinch
  32. Purple Finch
  33. American Crossbill
  34. Chewink
  35. Purple Grackle
  36. Baltimore Oriole
  37. Orchard Oriole
  38. Meadow Lark
  39. Starling
  40. American Crow
  41. Blue Jay
  42. Ruby Throated Hummingbird
  43. Chimney Swift
  44. Night Hawk
  45. Screech Owl
  46. Least Flycatcher
  47. Great Crested Flycatcher
  48. Wood Peewee
  49. Phoebe
  50. Kingbird
  51. Downy Woodpecker
  52. Hairy Woodpecker
  53. Red Headed Woodpecker
  54. Flicker
  55. Cuckoo
  56. Hawks
  57. Red Eyed Vireo
  58. White Breasted Nuthatch
  59. Junco
  60. Redpoll
  61. Golden Crowned Kinglet
  62. Chickadee

Extracted from The Building of Drew University by Charles Sitterly

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